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Most of us have become accustomed to, “The new normal”. At first when COVID-19 became most known, the fitness industry was shook up! There were people trying to sell overpriced exercise equipment and many training centers charging double and even triple the price for online programs. Due to this, many people simply resorted to sub-par exercising routines, or ceased to exercise completely!

So fast forward a few months, and we find ourselves in a new year! This is normally when people want a fresh start and to focus on actions that work to improve their health and overall quality of life. This year this has become much more serious of a matter for many due to sub-par training regimens courtesy of COVID-19.

You’re probably wondering if there is a way to supercharge results to catapult yourself out of a rut while accelerating fat loss, right?…

Well, you’re in luck because we have the solution…SUPERSETS!

Simply put, supersets are when someone engages in an exercise set, immediately following another. Some choose to superset by completing an upper-body exercise followed by a lower-body one. Others like to pair agonist and antagonist sets instead. Some trainers even recommend tri-sets (three exercises), or even giant sets (4 exercises)!

Supersets are so effective because they actively improve strength and conditioning at the same time. For those that do not like cardiovascular training, or even those that want to add more cardio into their routine without the notoriously boring treadmill, supersets will quickly become your best friend. The best part is that they also add an element of excitement to any exercise routine. They provide a phenomenal, “burn” that is typically associated with aerobic exercises, but then pack a potent classic pump that is associated with anaerobic exercises.

So what about fat loss? …and how will this help me to get out of the rut I’ve been in?

Great questions, and luckily we have an answer for you that we know you’ll love.

Supersets tend to leverage the use of prime muscle groups and so metabolic rate has been found to elevate in the 24-hour-post-workout recovery period after exercising. In one study, those that engaged in weight training that incorporated supersets were found to increase energy expenditure by a whopping 33 percent in a 60-minute recovery period compared to those engaged in traditional weight training. In yet another study, a circuit-style training system that incorporated supersets was found to improve concentration and memory in young women. If these reasons were not strong enough to have you adding supersets into your regimen, how about the fact that the improvements in aerobic capacity gained from supersets helps to lower blood pressure and resting heart rate!

Other benefits involve the improvement of insulin sensitivity, thus successfully lowering the risk of diabetes.

Before you go on and add supersets into your training routine, it is important to know that supersets can be adapted for athletes at every level from amateur to elite. The differences lie in the variations of speed at which the exercises are performed. For extremely advanced trainees who want to maximize power and performance, adding in tri-sets will work to improve the explosiveness of muscles by stimulating muscle fibers that are not otherwise targeted with slower movements.

If you’re looking for a way to maximize your strength, power, and explosiveness while improving your cardiovascular health and boosting fat-loss – – supersets is the answer.

Contact OBF Gyms for a complementary assessment to get started with one of our trainers today!

References:

https://main.poliquingroup.com/ArticlesMultimedia/Articles/Article/2782/Overcome_Training_Ruts_Accelerate_Fat_Loss_With_Su.aspx

Alacaraz, P., et al. Similarities in Adaptations To High-Resistance Circuit Vs. Traditional Strength Training in Resistance Trained Men. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2011. 25(9), 2519-2527

Kelleher, A., et al. The metabolic cost of reciprocal supersets vs. traditional resistance exercise in young recreationally active adults. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2010. 24(4). 1043-1051